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Urgent Bumblebee Officially On US Endangered Species List


Part of the challenge we face today is giving the bee a voice. There is no voice for bees that help us pollinate our foods that is why it is our job as good stewards of our lands to be a voice of change. Without the higher quality, health foods, created by the pollination of bees the World would be thrown in to chaos. Who wants to eat corn and soy the rest of our lives. Are we really wanting that be our reality along with eating chickens, cows, that are feed the toxic concoction of gmo corn and soy laced with pesticides and herbicides that are now found to cause cancer? We will all be subjected to the highly debated medical industry at that point, where cancer will have a true cure and subjected to pharmaceutical corporations. We have a HUGE issue on our hands here in the US. Other countries and third world countries are more advanced than our own country when in comes to terms with the agriculture and what is safe and right for the environment.

Here is a story that Nation Geographic just published about our Native Bumblebee.

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The bee’s population has plummeted nearly 90 percent since the 1990


It’s official: For the first time in the United States, a bumblebee species has been declared endangered.

The rusty patched bumblebee (Bombus affinis), once a common sight, is “now balancing precariously on the brink of extinction,” according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Once thriving in 28 states and the District of Columbia, but over the past two decades, the bee’s population has plummeted nearly 90 percent. There are more than 3,000 bee species in the United States, and about 40 belong to the genus Bombus—the bumblebees.

Advocates for the rusty patched bumblebee’s listing are abuzz with relief, but it may be the first skirmish in a grueling conflict over the fate of the Endangered Species Act under the Trump administration.

On January 11, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalized the bumblebee’s listing as an endangered species. But on January 20, the bee got stung by the Trump administration’s efforts to postpone and review Obama-era regulations that hadn’t yet taken into effect. On February 10, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the bumblebee’s listing would take effect on March 21, more than a month after it was originally scheduled.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Saving Bumblebees Became This Photographer's Mission

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt is on a multi-year quest to tell the stories of our native bees, and the rusty patched bumblebee has become his ‘white whale.’ This submission to National Geographic's Short Film Showcase was produced by Day's Edge Productions and Clay Bolt in partnership with Xerces Society and Endangered Species Chocolate.

The delay had been the subject of a tense legal battle: On February 14, the Natural Resources Defense Council filed suit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, arguing that the delay was illegal. In turn, industry groups including the National Cotton Council and the American Petroleum Institute had petitioned the agency to push back the listing until January 2018. The final March 21 listing renders both arguments moot.

“The Trump administration reversed course and listed the rusty patched bumblebee as an endangered species just in the nick of time. Federal protections may be the only thing standing between the bumblebee and extinction,” Rebecca Riley, senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council, said in a statement.

 

                                                                                                                                                                                    Saving Bumblebees Became This Photographer's Mission

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt is on a multi-year quest to tell the stories of our native bees, and the rusty patched bumblebee has become his ‘white whale.’ This submission to National Geographic's Short Film Showcase was produced by Day's Edge Productions and Clay Bolt in partnership with Xerces Society and Endangered Species Chocolate.

The delay had been the subject of a tense legal battle: On February 14, the Natural Resources Defense Council filed suit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, arguing that the delay was illegal. In turn, industry groups including the National Cotton Council and the American Petroleum Institute had petitioned the agency to push back the listing until January 2018. The final March 21 listing renders both arguments moot.

“The Trump administration reversed course and listed the rusty patched bumblebee as an endangered species just in the nick of time. Federal protections may be the only thing standing between the bumblebee and extinction,” Rebecca Riley, senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council, said in a statement.


Michael Greshko